R- German Soldier
A- French Citizen
F- Lost Letters
T- War and its lack of progress

Once again, the day started as Al, a worker at a gun assembling factory, unwillingly leaving his house. Al loathed his work. It was a waste of his talent. He was intelligent. Knowing how to speak both French and German, Al felt that he could be used for a better task. It was boring, tiring, and worst of all, his employer had the worst personality in the world. And he got paid so little for all his efforts. Hoping to find something valuable, he started to dig through the local trash pile. His eyes fell on a particularly shabby looking box. He rescued it and took a closer look at his treasure. It was full of letters. It was written in German. Instinctively, he ripped one open. The letter was written in neat handwriting but had mud splashed on several parts of the letter. He began to read it:

Dear Len,
Before I begin, I absolutely demand that you never sign up for the army. Ever since I have joined the war, it has been chaos. The war doesn't progress. What all the armies do is just massacring each other. The crazy deadlock has continued for a week. Everyday, thousands die for no reason. Soldiers forget what they are fighting for. We even start to lose consciousness of what side we are fighting with. We live in the filthiest conditions. The trenches are filled with mud, as you can see from this letter. The weaponry are astonishing. A single machine gun can take on a entire troop. Poison gas is killing everyone on the battlefield. Planes are bombing every inch of the battlefield. Life here is terror.
Is everyone fine? I hope none of them are suffering the same chaos as me. I’ll limit myself to that question as I run out of time. I must return to the battlefield.

Sincerely,
Jack


Al finished reading the first letter. He looked at the pile of letters and felt sweat running down his back just at the thought of all the pain and suffering there were in those letters. He returned the box to the trash pile and hurried off to work, grateful for the job he had.